THE EARLY YEARS

How it all began!

 
Alison Multa one of the Traditional Owners of this land who had the first vision for the construction of this cross. 

Alison Multa one of the Traditional Owners of this land who had the first vision for the construction of this cross. 

The Vision of The People

This painting depicts a vision that my people have about a cross being raised on our land
at a place called Roundhouse Mountain (also known as Memory Mountain). 

 
 

Since 1982, a group of indigenous Christians has been singing songs of faith and hope almost every night for hours at a time. They call this phenomenon “sing along”. This hasn’t been imposed on the indigenous Christians by any other race; it’s their own form of worship.

When the singing started, people came from far and wide and it would go on for hours. As various groups got involved in this indigenous worship, their communities were transformed overnight.

Many long-term issues like sexual immorality, drug abuse and petrol sniffing miraculously began to fall away. Today the police station at Haasts Bluff is rarely staffed and the community is a safe place to live.

 

In 2009, the local people held a service at the place they call “Memory”. This is where the local people have built a memorial to the 4 indigenous evangelists who originally spread the Christian message throughout the western desert regions. They said tribes would be coming from all around to be part of this Easter Sing Along to celebrate their Christian heritage.

During that event, three community leaders shared their vision to build a cross on top of nearby Memory Mountain.

Since that event discussions were held with all stakeholders to obtain permission to construct a 22m high steel cross here. Walk A While Foundation led by photographer Ken Duncan has been funding the project as a cultural initiative, reflecting the faith, creativity, hope and essence of this incredible community.